Redox Homeostasis and Bio(in)organic Chemistry of Reactive Sulfur Species: Probes

A. Stojanovic (1st year)

We are interested in the development of new probes, with an emphasis on the design of fluorescent and optical probes for hydrogen sulfide, and on the development of redox-sensitive EPR probes for the monitoring of redox homeostasis deregulation.

 

Redox-sensitive EPR probes

EPR spectroscopy in association with molecular probes has been successfully applied to monitor the redox status of tumors or to assess various pathological conditions in rodent models. However, commercially available molecular probes are extremely limited in number, and they display poor biostability and specificity that makes the interpretation of observations difficult.
In recent years, we started addressing this problem by developing new redox-sensitive probes derived from tetraethyl-substituted nitroxides or (protected) hydroxylamines. Formulation of these lipophilic probes using nanoemulsions is required for in vivo applications (collaboration with Dr C. Roques, Unité de Technologies Chimiques et Biologiques pour la Santé, Université de Paris, and with Pr M. Mojović, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Serbia).

Fluorescent & optical probes for H2S

We used recombinant Hemoglobin I Hb-I from the clam Lucina pectinata, a protein which rapidly, selectively and reversibly bind H2S with high affinity, to propose a fluorescent system in solutionand an optical biosensor resulting from the grafting of Hb-I on mesoporous transparent conductive electrodes. Both system can reversibly detect H2S at low concentration (approx. 1 µM) in biological fluids like human plasma (In collaboration with Dr V. Balland, Laboratoire d’Electrochimie Moléculaire, Université de Paris)

Latest publications (full list here)

New synthetic route to 2,2,6,6-tetraethylpiperidin-4-one: A key-intermediate…
Babić N., Peyrot F. Tetrahedron Lett. (2019) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tetlet.2019.151207

An optical H2S biosensor based on the chemoselective Hb-I…
M. Dulac, A. Melet,  et al.
Sens. Actuator B-Chem. (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.snb.2019.03.124

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reversible Detection and Quantification of Hydrogen Sulfide by Fluorescence… Dulac M, Melet A, et al.
ACS Sens. (2018 ) https://doi.org/10.1021/acssensors.8b00701

Synthesis, characterization and reactivity of 3‐mercaptopyruvic acid.  Galardon E, Lec JC  Chembiochem (2018)

A new link between high homocysteine levels, cancers and …
Padovani D.
Med. Sci. (2017)
https://doi.org/10.1051/medsci/20173305012 

 

Redox Homeostasis and Bio(in)organic Chemistry of Reactive Sulfur Species: Probes

We are interested in the development of new probes, with an emphasis on the design of fluorescent and optical probes for hydrogen sulfide, and on the development of redox-sensitive EPR probes for the monitoring of redox homeostasis deregulation.

Redox-sensitive EPR probes

EPR spectroscopy in association with molecular probes has been successfully applied to monitor the redox status of tumors or to assess various pathological conditions in rodent models. However, commercially available molecular probes are extremely limited in number, and they display poor biostability and specificity that makes the interpretation of observations difficult.
In recent years, we started addressing this problem by developing new redox-sensitive probes derived from tetraethyl-substituted nitroxides or (protected) hydroxylamines. Formulation of these lipophilic probes using nanoemulsions is required for in vivo applications (collaboration with Dr C. Roques, Unité de Technologies Chimiques et Biologiques pour la Santé, Université de Paris, and with Pr M. Mojović, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Serbia).

 

Fluorescent & optical probes for H2S

We used recombinant Hemoglobin I Hb-I from the clam Lucina pectinata, a protein which rapidly, selectively and reversibly bind H2S with high affinity, to propose a fluorescent system in solutionand an optical biosensor resulting from the grafting of Hb-I on mesoporous transparent conductive electrodes. Both system can reversibly detect H2S at low concentration (approx. 1 µM) in biological fluids like human plasma (In collaboration with Dr V. Balland, Laboratoire d’Electrochimie Moléculaire, Université de Paris)